Timothy Loher , Ph.D.

Timothy Loher , Ph.D.

Research Scientist
Biological & Ecosystem Sciences Branch

206-634-1838x7674

Current IPHC Responsibilities

Over the last 16 years I have been responsible for the development and execution of ecological research to investigate life-history, behavior, and spatial stock structure of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in the eastern Pacific Ocean.  Research projects for which I have been responsible include early life history analysis, otolith microchemical studies, genetic population structure and sex-identification, and the examination of migration, seasonal reproductive biology, and discard mortality using electronic tagging technologies.

Background 

I received my BS in Biology—with minors in Chemistry and Secondary Education—from the State University of New York (Geneseo) in 1987; and an MS in Marine Biology from Northeastern University (Boston) in 1992.  Following my Masters work I spent two years (1992-1994) in southern Maryland at The Academy of Natural Sciences’ (Philadelphia) Benedict Estuarine Research Laboratory (BERL), before moving to Seattle to complete a PhD in Fisheries at the University of Washington (UW; dissertation completed in 2001).

Throughout my graduate career—and at BERL—I specialized in early life history of benthic invertebrates and fishes; in particular, the effects of physical forcing functions, larval dispersal, and early post-settlement processes on population function and spatial recruitment dynamics. My Masters thesis examined the role of post-settlement predation by fish (Cunner; Tautogolabrus adspersus) on the distribution of juvenile barnacles and mussels; my PhD was an examination of the effects of female spawning stock distribution, larval advection, and early juvenile habitat requirements on the spatial population structure and recruitment history of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) in the southeastern Bering Sea.  At BERL, our research group examined dynamics associated with the establishment and maintenance of benthic fish communities on oyster reefs:  the effects of nutrient loads and associated low dissolved oxygen on the ability of fish larvae to escape pelagic predators, and relationships between small-scale current features and settlement intensity and distribution of goby larvae.

In addition, at Northeastern I was involved in Caribbean coral reef research – primarily examining settlement dynamics and post-settlement competition among sessile benthic invertebrates including corals, sponges, and colonial ascidians; examining larval and nutrient delivery to deepwater marine pinnacle habitats in the Gulf of Maine; and relationships between fishery pressure, fish predation, and invertebrate community structure in nearshore versus offshore ecosystems in New England.  At the UW, I  acted as field research coordinator for studies of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) recruitment in Oregon and Washington; and as a research diver for studies examining recovery of benthic ecosystems in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill.  At both institutions, my training in secondary education was put to use teaching laboratories and classes for undergraduate and graduate courses in introductory zoology, marine invertebrate biology, tropical fish biology, coral reef ecology, marine benthic ecology, marine fisheries, tropical-terrestrial ecology, and advanced plant biology.

Research Activities

Of considerable interest both scientifically and with respect to management are the spatial and temporal scales at which exploited populations function relative to the scales at which harvest occurs and management actions operate.  Since arriving at the Halibut Commission in 2001, I have attempted to design a suite of research that pays attention to scale-dependent process, links them to management concerns and potential management actions, and is composed of integrated experiments that, when taken together, will produce a broader understanding of intersections between the life history of Pacific halibut and its fisheries.  My initial research focused on early life history: in particular, endeavoring to understand the origins of recruitment for each region of the fishery by tracking halibut back to their nursery of origin (using otolith microchemistry); and identifying halibut spawning groups (using fishery-independent tagging) as a precursor to broadscale analysis of connections between spawning groups and the nursery grounds that they support (via larval advection modelling).  Such dynamics can be important for managing harvest rates so as to maintain historical spawning stock distribution and for understanding and managing spatial impacts associated with both fishing mortality and natural disturbance.

Over time, my research has broadened to include studies of the seasonal redistribution of exploitable stock (important for considering fishery season dates and for understanding the relationship between stock distribution as indexed by our summer surveys relative to its distribution when integrated over the full fishing season); examinations of interannual dispersal on regional bases and, in collaboration with geneticists at the UW, genetic population structure (important for tuning the spatial structure of stock assessment models to population function; and for understanding the time-scales over which recovery from exploitation and disturbance might occur, on regional scales); genetic sex identification of the landed catch (required to properly estimate female spawning stock biomass); and improving indices of trawl and longline discard mortality (using electronic tagging technologies) while developing handling practices that minimize the impacts of discarding (e.g., “expedited release”) while still allowing for estimates of fish viability to be derived (e.g., by relating mortality rates to factors such time out of water and deck temperature).

In addition, I have been called upon to provide my expertise to research groups studying Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canadian Maritimes, and coastal New England; European flounder (Platichthys flesus) along the Iberian Peninsula; and the effects of climate change on larval dispersal and recruitment success of Bristol Bay red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus).

Publications and Presentations

Peer-Reviewed Publications

  • Fisher, J.A.D., Robert, D., Le Bris, A., and Loher, T.  In revision.  Pop-up satellite archival tag (PSAT) temporal data resolution affects interpretations of spawning behavior and vertical habitat use.  Animal Biotelemetry
  • Loher, T., and Carlile, D.W.   In revision.  A test of the detection range of acoustic transmitters and receivers deployed in deep waters of Southeast Alaska, USA.  Animal Biotelemetry
  • LeBris, A., Fisher, J.A.D., Murphy, H.M., Galbraith, P.S., Castonguay, M., Loher, T., and Robert, D.  2017.  Migration patterns and putative spawning habitats of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence revealed by geolocation of pop-up satellite archival tags.  ICES Journal of Marine Science.  (online) doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fsx098
  • Murphy, H.M., Fisher, J.A.D., Le Bris, A., Desgagnés, M., Castonguay, M., Loher, T., and Robert, D.  2017.  Pop-up satellite tags provide the first characterizations of depth distributions, temperature associations, and seasonal migrations of Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Marine and Coastal Fisheries.  (online) doi: 10.1080/19425120.2017.1327905
  • Seitz, A.C., Loher, T., Farrugia, T.J., Norcross, B.L., and Nielsen, J.L.  2017.  Basin-scale reproductive segregation of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis).  Fisheries Management and Ecology 24:339-346.  doi: 10.1111/fme.12233
  • Drinan, D.P., Galindo, H.M, Loher, T., and Hauser, L.  2016.  Subtle genetic population structure in Pacific halibut.  Journal of Fish Biology 89:2571-2594.  doi: 10.1111/jfb.13148
  • Loher, T., Woods, M.A., Jimenez-Hidalgo, I., and Hauser, L.   2016.  Variance in age-specific sex ratios of Pacific halibut catches and comparison of statistical and genetic methods for reconstructing sex ratios.  Journal of Sea Research 107:90-99.  doi: 10.1016/j.seares.2015.06.004
  • Kastelle, C.R., Helser, T.E., Wischniowski, S., Loher, T., Goetz, B.J., and Kautzi, L.A.  2015.  Incorporation of bomb-produced 14C into fish otoliths: a novel approach for evaluating age validation and bias with application to yellowfin sole and northern rockfish.  Ecological Modelling 320:71-91.  doi: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2015.09.013
  • Wischniowski, S., Kastelle, C.R., Loher, T., and Helser, T.E.  2015.  Incorporation of bomb-produced 14C into fish otoliths.  An example of basin-specific rates, from the North Pacific Ocean.  Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 72(6):879-892. doi: 10.1139/cjfas.2014.0225
  • Loher, T.  2014.  Modeling Larval Advection and Spatial Population Structure in King Crabs: Interactions among Life-History Requirements, Extrinsic Forcing, and Source–Sink Dynamics.  Pp. 539-582.  In B.G. Stevens (ed.), King Crabs of the World: Biology and Fisheries Management.  CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.  Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
  • Loher, T., and Hobden, J.C.   2012.  Length and sex effects on the spatial structure of catches of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) on longline gear.  Fishery Bulletin 110(1):46-51.
  • Loher, T., and Stephens, S.M.  2011.  Use of veterinary ultrasound to identify sex and assess female maturity of Pacific Halibut in nonspawning condition.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 31:1034-1042. doi: 10.1080/02755947.2011.635240
  • Galindo, H.M., Loher, T., and Hauser, L.  2011.  Genetic sex identification and the potential evolution of sex determination in Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis).  Marine Biotechnology 13(5):1027-1037.  doi: 10.1007/s10126-011-9366-7
  • Loher, T.  2011.  Analysis of match-mismatch between commercial fishing periods and spawning ecology of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), based on winter surveys and behavioural data from electronic tags.  ICES Journal of Marine Science 68(10):2240-2251.  doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fsr152
  • Loher, T., and Rensmeyer, R.   2011.  Physiological responses of Pacific halibut, Hippoglossus stenolepis, to intracoelomic implantation of electronic archival tags, with a review of tag implantation techniques employed in flatfishes.  Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 21(1):1027-1037.  doi: 10.1007/s11160-010-9192-4
  • Seitz, A.C., Loher, T., Norcross, B.L., and Nielsen, J.L.  2011.  Dispersal and behavior of Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands region.  Aquatic Biology 12:225-239.  doi: 10.3354/ab00333
  • Loher, T., and Blood, C.A.  2009.  Seasonal dispersion of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) summering off British Columbia and the US Pacific Northwest evaluated via satellite archival tagging.  Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 66:1409-1422.  doi: 10.1139/F09-093
  • Loher, T., Wischniowski, S., and Martin, G.B.  2008.  Elemental chemistry of left and right sagittal otoliths in a marine fish Hippoglossus stenolepis Schmidt displaying cranial asymmetry.  Journal of Fish Biology 73:870-887.  doi: 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01982.x
  • Loher, T., and Seitz, A.C.  2008.  Characterization of active spawning season and depth for eastern Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), and evidence of probable skipped spawning.  Journal of Northwest Atlantic Fishery Science 41:23-36.
  • Loher, T.  2008.  Homing and summer feeding site fidelity of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in the Gulf of Alaska, established using satellite-transmitting archival tags.  Fishery Research 92:63-69.  doi: 10.1016/j.fishres.2007.12.013
  • Loher, T.  2008.  Investigating variability in catch rates of halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in the Pribilof Islands: Is temperature important?  Deep-Sea Research II 55:1801-1808.  doi: 10.1016/j.dsr2.2008.04.002
  • Loher, T., and Seitz, A.C.  2006.  Seasonal migration and environmental conditions experienced by Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis), elucidated from pop-up archival transmitting tags.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 317:259-271.
  • Loher, T., and Armstrong, D.A.  2005.  Historical changes in the abundance and distribution of adult female red king crabs (Parlithodes camtschaticus) in Bristol Bay (Alaska), and potential relationship with bottom temperature.  Fisheries Oceanography 14:292-306.
  • Loher, T., Armstrong, D.A, and Stevens, B.G.  2001.  Growth of juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus Tilesius) in Bristol Bay (Alaska) elucidated from field sampling and analysis of trawel survey data. Fishery Bulletin 99:572-587.
  • Loher, T., and Armstrong, D.A.  2000. Effects of habitat complexity and relative larval supply on the establishment of early benthic phase red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus Tilesius, 1815) populations in Auke Bay, Alaska. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 245:83-109.
  • Loher, T., Hill, P.S., Harrington, G., and Cassano, E.  1998.  Management of Bristol Bay red king crab: A critical intersections approach to fisheries management.  Reviews in Fisheries Science 6(3):169-251.
  • Breitburg, D.L., Loher, T., Pacey, C.A., and Gerstein, A.  1997.  Varying effects of low dissolved oxygen on trophic interactions in an estuarine food web.  Ecological Monographs 67(4):489-507.
  • Breitburg, D.L., Palmer, M.A., and Loher, T.  1995.  Larval distributions and the spatial patterns of settlement of an oyster reef fish: responses to flow and structure.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 125:45-60.
  • Breitburg, D.L. and Loher, T.  1994.  Effects of Physical Disturbance on Fish Trophic Interactions: The Importance of Consumer Mobility.  Pp. 241-253.  In D.J. Stouder, K. Fresh, and R.J. Feller (eds.), Feeding Ecology of Fishes: Theory and Application.  Belle Baruch Library in Marine Science, University of South Carolina Press.  Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Externally Reviewed Institutional Reports

  • Seitz, A.C., Loher, T., and Nielsen, J.L.   2016.  Further investigation of seasonal migration and environmental conditions experienced by Pacific halibut in the Bering Sea, examined by pop-up satellite tags.  International Pacific Halibut Commission (Seattle, WA, USA), Scientific Report 86, 28pp.
  • Seitz, A.C., Loher, T., and Nielsen, J.L.   2008.  Seasonal migration and environmental conditions experienced by Pacific halibut along the Aleutian Islands, examined by pop-up satellite tags.  International Pacific Halibut Commission (Seattle, WA, USA), Scientific Report 85, 24pp.
  • Seitz, A.C., Loher, T., and Nielsen, J.L.  2007.  Seasonal migration and environmental conditions experienced by Pacific halibut in the Bering Sea, examined by pop-up satellite tags.  International Pacific Halibut Commission (Seattle, WA, USA), Scientific Report 84, 24pp.
  • Loher, T., and Seitz, A.C..   2006.  Seasonal migration and environmental conditions experienced by Pacific halibut in the Gulf of Alaska, elucidated from Pop-up Archival Transmitting (PAT) tags.  International Pacific Halibut Commission (Seattle, WA, USA), Scientific Report 82, 39pp.
  • Hauser, L., Spies, I., and Loher, T.  2006.  Microsatellite screening in Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and a preliminary examination of population structure based on observed DNA variation.  International Pacific Halibut Commission (Seattle, WA, USA), Scientific Report 81, 27pp.
  • Loher, T.., Harrington, G.A., and Cassano, E.  1995.  Management of Bristol Bay red king crab: a critical intersections approach to fisheries management.  University of Washington Fisheries Research Institute (Seattle, WA, USA), Report SMA/FRI-UW-9510, 70pp.

Selected Internal Reports

  • Loher T., Dykstra, C.L., Kong, T.M., Erikson, L.M., and Stewart, I.J.  2017.  Voluntary at-sea sex marking of Pacific halibut in the targeted longline fleet.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2016: 110-121.
  • Drinan, D., Loher T., and Hauser, L.  2017.  Development of production-scale genetic sexing techniques for routine catch sampling of Pacific halibut.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2016: 110-121.
  • Loher T.  2016.  Deployment and reporting of pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags to study seasonal dispersal of Pacific halibut in the southern Salish Sea.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2015: 478-489.
  • Loher T.  2013.  Potential mechanisms, research avenues, and management action associated with size at age and growth of Pacific halibut.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2012: 457-486.
  • Loher T., and Nielsen, J.K.  2012.  Test deployment of geomagnetic-sensing electronic archival tags in IPHC Regulatory Areas 2C and 3A.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2011: 483-490.
  • Wischniowski, S., and Loher T.  2011.  Detecting, interpreting, and measuring both true and false annuli in Pacific halibut ages one to four: project update.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2010: 325-328.
  • Loher T., and Clark, W.G.  2011.  Deployment, recovery, and reporting of pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags to study interannual dispersal in IPHC Regulatory Area 4.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2010: 353-362.
  • Wischniowski, S., and Loher T.  2007.  False annuli identification in juvenile halibut ages one to four using LA-ICP-MS.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2006: 207-210.
  • Loher T., and Wischniowski S.  2006.  Using otolith chemistry to determine halibut nursery origin: an initial test of concept.  In: L Sadorus (ed) International Pacific Halibut Commission Report of Assessment and Research Activities 2005: 179–190.

International Conference and Invited Speaker Presentations

  • “Satellite tags to measure halibut survival after trawler deck-release.”  C. Rose, J. Nielsen, J. Gauvin, T. Loher, P. Drobny, A. Seitz, M. Courtney, and S. Sethi.  Alaska Marine Science Symposium, Anchorage, USA; 23-27 January 2017.
  • “Satellite-reporting accelerometer tags for monitoring survival of trawler-deck released halibut.”  C. Rose, P. Drobny, J. Gauvin, J. Nielsen, A. Seitz, T. Loher, S. Martell and T. Lindstrom.  Alaska Marine Science Symposium, Anchorage, USA; 25-29 January 2016.
  • “A biophysical modeling approach to understanding red king crab larval drift in Bristol Bay, Alaska.”  B. Daly, C. Parada, S. Hinkley, D. Armstrong, T. Loher and A. Hermann.  Alaska Marine Science Symposium, Anchorage, USA; 25-29 January 2016.
  •  “Researching the behavior and life history of (eastern) Pacific halibut: Issues of scale and relevance to management.”  T. Loher.  University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science, Seattle, USA; Spring Seminar Series, April 2014.  Memorial University of Newfoundland Fisheries and Marine Institute, St. Johns, Canada; Fall Seminar Series, September 2014.
  • “Interbasin connectivity and temporal scale in Pacific halibut: Lessons from alleles, electronics, and atom bombs.” T. Loher, A. Seitz, L. Hauser, H. Galindo and S. Wischnioswki.  54th Meeting of the Estuarine and Coastal Sciences Association (ECSA 54), Sesimbra, Portugal; 12-16 May 2014.
  • “Evidence of pelagic spawning in Pacific halibut: Implications for enhanced understanding of population function and life history strategies.”  T. Loher.  Ninth International Flatfish Symposium, Cle Elum, USA; 8-13 November 2014.
  • “Basin-scale connectivity in eastern Pacific halibut and its relevance to stock assessment modelling: Lessons from electronics and atom bombs”  T. Loher and S. Wischniowski.  Ninth International Flatfish Symposium, Cle Elum, USA; 8-13 November 2014.
  • “Population structure and sex identification in Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) from genomic and gene-linked microsatellites.”  L. Hauser, H. Galindo and T. Loher.  Ninth International Flatfish Symposium, Cle Elum, USA; 8-13 November 2014.
  • “Does Pacific halibut behavior follow regular environmental cycles?”  A. Seitz, J. Scott, T. Farrugia, M. Courtney, J. Nielsen and T. Loher.  Ninth International Flatfish Symposium, Cle Elum, USA; 8-13 November 2014.
  • “Distribution and habitat preferences of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.”  D. Robert, H.M. Murphy, J.A.D. Fisher, M. Castonguay, and T. Loher.  Ninth International Flatfish Symposium, Cle Elum, USA; 8-13 November 2014.
  • “Detection range of acoustic transmitters in deep waters of Southeast Alaska, USA.”  T. Loher, D. Carlile, A. Vatter, J. Eiler, J. Nielsen, C. Tribuzio and C. Lunsford.  Second International Conference on Fish Telemetry, Grahamstown, South Africa; 14-19 July 2013.
  • “Reconciling contradictory tagging results to develop a coherent model of large-scale mixing and segregation in Pacific halibut: a lesson in biases.”  T. Loher and A. Seitz.  Eighth International Flatfish Symposium, IJmuiden, Netherlands; 5-10 November 2011.
  • “Basin-specific rates of incorporation of bomb-produced 14C in fish otoliths: an example from the North Pacific Ocean.”  S. Wischniowski, T. Loher, C. Kastelle and T. Helser.  American Fisheries Society 141st Annual Meeting, Seattle, USA; 4-8 September 2011.
  • “Detection range of acoustic transmitters in deep waters of Southeast Alaska.”  D. Carlile, T. Loher, A. Vatter, J. Eiler, J. Nielsen, C. Tribuzio and C. Lunsford.  American Fisheries Society 141st Annual Meeting, Seattle, USA; 4-8 September 2011.
  • “Regional and temporal variance in spawn-timing versus fisheries economics: a recipe for anthropogenically-induced contraction of the natural spawning period of pacific halibut?”  T. Loher.  ICES Annual Science Conference, Nantes, France; 20-24 September 2010.
  • “Intradecadal changes in sexually dimorphic size-at-maturity of eastern Pacific halibut: density-dependence, environmental effects, or results of a size-selective fishery?”  T. Loher  and L. Sadorus.  Seventh International Flatfish Symposium, Sesimbra, Portugal; 2-7 November 2008.
  •  “Long-term shift in spawn-timing of eastern Pacific halibut: potential contributions of ocean conditions, fisheries selectivity, and method-specific bias.”  T. Loher  and A. Seitz.  Seventh International Flatfish Symposium, Sesimbra, Portugal; 2-7 November 2008.
  • “Characterization of active spawning season and depth for Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) in the Gulf of Alaska, and evidence of probable skipped spawning.”  T. Loher and A. Seitz.  American Fisheries Society Tagging and Marking Symposium, Auckland, New Zealand; 24-28 February 2008.
  • “Competing paradigms of population structure in Pacific halibut, derived from different tagging techniques: a lesson in tag-specific biases.”  T. Loher and A.C. Seitz.  American Fisheries Society Tagging and Marking Symposium, Auckland, New Zealand; 24-28 February 2008.
  • “Evidence of possible skipped spawning in Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and its potential to impact effective spawning biomass.”  T. Loher and A.C. Seitz.  NAFO/PISCES/ICES Symposium on Reproductive and Recruitment Processes in Exploited Marine Fish Stocks, Lisbon, Portugal; 1-3 October 2007.
  • “Eastern Pacific halibut: What we know, what we don’t, and why we care.”  T. Loher.  Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport, USA; Evening Seminar Series, April 2007.
  • “Otoliths as natural tags to study the dispersal of Pacific halibut: variation in juvenile otolith microchemistry, and the importance of scale.”  T. Loher, S. Wischniowski and G. Bath-Martin.  Sixth International Flatfish Symposium, Maizuru, Japan; 20-25 October 2005.
  • “Spatial variation in otolith elemental fingerprints of early juvenile halibut in Alaskan waters.”  T. Loher and S. Wischniowski.  Third International Symposium on Fish Otolith Research and Application, Townsville, Australia; 11-16 July 2004.
  • “Effects of post-capture handling protocols on the detection of trace elements in early juvenile Pacific halibut otoliths.”  T. Loher and S. Wischniowski.  Third International Symposium on Fish Otolith Research and Application, Townsville, Australia; 11-16 July 2004.
  •  “Use of Pop-up Archival Transmitting (PAT) tags to examine seasonal spawning migrations in Pacific halibut in the Gulf of Alaska.”  T. Loher and A. Seitz.  Fifth International Flatfish Symposium, Port Erin, UK; 3-7 November 2003.
  • “Advection of red king crab larvae in the Southeast Bering Sea: Interactions between changes in spatial broodstock population structure and physical forcing mechanisms.”  T. Loher and D.A. Armstrong.  ASLO-AGU Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, USA; 11-15 February 2002.

Professional Activities

  • Expert reviewer for the University of Alaska’s Global Chance Student Research Grant Competition and the North Pacific Research Board.  Steering Committee Member: International Flatfish Symposia (http://www.flatfishsymposium.com/home).

External Research Collaborations

  • “Halibut survival from trawlers using alternative handling methods.”  C. Rose (FishNext Research); P. Drobny (Spearfish Research); J. Gauvin (Alaska Seafood Cooperative); T. Loher, S. Martell (IPHC), J. Nielsen (Kingfisher Marine Research); A. Seitz (UAF-Fairbanks).  North Pacific Research Board Project #1510.
  • “Integrated natural and artificial tags to reconstruct fish migrations and ontogenetic niche shifts.” F. Martinho, A. Martins, A.L. Primo, D.J. Andrade e Crespo, E. Silva (Universidade de Coimbra); H.N. Cabra, H. Fereira, J. Atunes, M. Fereira, M.A. Pardal, P.N.B. Reis dos Santos, R.P. Vasconcelos, S.E. Tanner, V.F. Fonseca (Universidade de Lisboa); S. Ramos, V. Freitas (Universidade de Porto); T. Loher (IPHC). Fundação para a Ciência e a Technologia (Portugal) Project Reference #PTC/MAR-EST/2098/2014.
  • “Development of a pilot setline survey and tagging program for Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.”  D. Robert, J.A.D. Fisher (Memorial University of Newfoundland); M. Castonguay (DFO Mont-Joli); J. Spingle (Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union); T. Loher (IPHC).  Project jointly-funded by the FFAW, DFO, and the Provincial Government of Newfoundland.
  • “Impacts of climate change on red king crab larval advection in Bristol Bay: implications for recruitment variability.”  B. Daly (NOAA-AFSC); D.A. Armstrong (UW-SAFS); A.J. Hermann, S. Hinkley (UW-JISAO); C. Parada-Veliz (University of Conception); T. Loher (IPHC).  North Pacific Research Board Project #1402.